A working partnership

Once planted this area will improve drainage
(photo: Luke 'Duke' Newcombe)

Sometime in the next week or so the work on Mayes Road will near completion. The three large planting areas will be completed, new seating provided and the road significantly narrowed to deter illegal waiting and parking. Two of the new planted areas will contribute to more sustainable drainage and take pressure off the overloaded surface water system.

Virgin Media are under pressure to sort out their decrepit cable junction box. This process began more than a year ago when Haringey supported Marcus Ballard’s bid to a ‘linear pocket park’ fund at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government – the Lost House mural was the opening project.

Then the Haringey Regeneration team, working with their design consultants muf, made a successful bid to the GLA as part of the Wood Green Places strategy. This envisaged major improvements to the road and footway, the first phase of which has now been put in place by contractors instructed by Highways.

More design features will be added by PMRA in the months to come. This has been an ambitious partnership and a difficult one at times. But recent meetings have been constructive focusing on the detail and with welcome input from the Council’s Parks Department. Thanks to Peter Thompson for pulling these strands together so well. 

As we were before the lockdown

For the first six months the main maintenance responsibility will sit with the sub-contractors responsible for putting in new trees and plants. It’s not the best time of year for installing trees but PMRA hopes new residents will join us in their upkeep and with the additional watering in summer. We want this to be a social space that is better used both by our local community and by visitors passing through.

It will be a new benchmark for the look and feel of our neighbourhood and enhance its biodiversity. The planters sit in front of the shrubbery (with its wonderful apple tree that has survived from a house demolished in the 70s for the Mall) and will be framed by the mature trees in the garden behind.

Nature doesn’t make distinctions between public and private space. In a National Park City, Wood Green should have more interfaces between gardens and community places to benefit wildlife and delight the eye. 

JM: 2/05/2020

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  • © Parkside Malvern Residents Association 

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